England’s Physical Disability squad pledge to run a marathon a day for charity
Callum Flynn flays through the off side Chris Whiteoak

May 6, 2020

  • ESPNcricinfo staff

England’s Physical Disability cricket squad is aiming to complete a marathon a day to help raise funds for the Lord’s Taverners.

The squad, which finished as runners-up in the Physical Disability World Series last summer, has pledged to complete 26 miles of running every day for at least ten days, as part of the #TwoPointSixChallenge fundraising drive.

Twelve members of the side are sharing their training efforts online as they look to complete their challenge of more than 260 miles.

Callum Flynn, a member of England’s PD squad, said: “Like all athletes, we wish we could be outside playing right now, so while we wait to return the pitch, we all wanted to put our energy into something positive.

“We decided to raise funds for the fantastic work of the Lord’s Taverners and hopefully raise the profile of disability cricket at the same time. We are looking to run at least 260 miles collectively over the next 10 days.

— Lord’s Taverners (@LordsTaverners) May 5, 2020

“We know from our own experiences what cricket can do for people with a disability – how it can improve your confidence, your health and ultimately your life. It would be amazing if we could raise some money to support the Lord’s Taverners and their life-changing work.”

Tom Harrison, ECB Chief Executive Officer, said: “Our disability squads consistently amaze us with what they achieve both on and off the field. These guys are exceptional cricketers and individuals and we are incredibly proud of what they are doing to support the Lord’s Taverners. I hope their considerable efforts will raise a significant sum of money for the charity.”

Their efforts are the latest in a series of charitable endeavours from England’s cricketers since the start of the Covid-19 outbreak. Last month, Jos Buttler auctioned his World Cup-winning shirt for more than £65,000, while Ben Stokes this week ran his first half-marathon in a time of 1 hour and 39 minutes to raise funds for the NHS, after being inspired by three amateur cricketers who ran the full distance in their back gardens.